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20121201
20121231
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KQEH (PBS) 44
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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership. >> woodruff: paul solman explores the tax deductions that could be on the chopping block in the quest to bring down the deficit. >> we estimate $1.1 trillion a year in revenue the government gives up because of all the tax breaks. that's enough to solve the revenue problem but it's not going to happen. >> ifill: ray suarez has a newsmaker interview with secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. >> you can discuss border security and immigration reform simultaneously now. we don't have to this kind of first this and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working c
with the organized labor movement, michigan, has approved legislation vastly limiting the power of unions in the state. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the passage of the right to work laws and the angry demonstrations inside and outside the state capital building. >> woodruff: then, we turn to protests in another part of the world, egypt, where supporters and opponents of president morsi staged rival rallies in cairo four days ahead of vote on a proposed constitution. >> suarez: next in our series of conversations about solving the fiscal crisis, gwen ifill talks with representative allyson schwartz, a democrat from pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more peopl
the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release
for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sides involved in this are very happy. >> and this whole situation stems from the riders case. remind us, again, what that was. that was a police brutality case. >> yeah. there were some officers who were accused of framing suspects and in the wake of that, there was millions of dollars paid out in civil lawsuits, but a
washington isn't talking about jobs. >> and i think one reason for this is the decline of labor unions. it used to be that when the union movement was much bigger and more powerful, and especially when private sector workers dominated the union movement, the afl-cio sort of looked out for the working class. they looked out for all workers, not just union workers. they understood that a healthy working class having lots of jobs was ultimately to the benefit of their members. and i think the decline in power of the unions and now and the fact that public sector unions now dominate the afl-cio is a key reason for that. the other thing is kind of a dirty secret, which you may not agree with is that fundamentally barack obama's pretty conservative. he really is. he's an eisenhower conservative. he's not a liberal. i mean, he's -- and i think that's one of the problems with the democratic party is they're looking for leadership to a guy on an issue like why aren't we creating jobs? why isn't there more aggregate demand in the economy? and it's because their guy doesn't really want it. >> i a
coast ports, is almost over. federal mediators say dockworkers represented by the longshoremen's union and the u.s. maritime alliance are close to finalizing a new labor deal. so close, that they've extended the deadline on negotiations by another 30 days. this heads off a strike that could have begun on sunday, crippling 14 important ports. the possibility of a strike worried retailers, manufacturers, and farmers, and risked losses in the billions. >> susie: our next guest says once the fiscal cliff mess is resolved, there will be an explosion of mergers and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there
swarmed the state capital as lawmakers passed a bill prohibiting unions from requiring employees to join and pay dues. the move would make michigan, one of the most union-friendly states, the 24th "right to work" state, where union dues are voluntary. >> tom: more bumpy skies for boeing's 787 dreamliner. boeing's much anticipated and high-profile plane was grounded last week, according to "the new york times." the federal aviation administration also has ordered that fuel line connectors on all 787s be inspected. analysts call these problems minor hiccups. but as sylvia hall reports, the dreamliner's profitability to boeing right now is raising bigger concerns. >> reporter: boeing's 787 dreamliner promises to use about 20% less fuel than other planes. that's a big deal for an airline industry struggling with fuel costs. so far, boeing's sold more than 800 of its dreamliners, but the project has been plagued with three years of costly production delays. the company is ramping up production on the planes, but some analysts don't expect the company to see a profit from the line until at lea
in any state in the union. >> bills to change the law to make it harder for american citizens to vote, those were alec bills. bills to dramatically change the rights of americans who were killed or injured by corporations, those were alec bills. bills to make it harder for unions to do their work were alec bills. bills to basically block climate change agreements, those were alec bills. when i looked at them, i was really shocked. i didn't know how incredibly extensive and deep and far-reaching this effort to rework our laws was. >> she and her team began to plow through alec documents, as well as public sources, to compile a list of the organizations and people who were or had been alec members. they found hundreds of corporations, from coca-cola and koch industries to exxon mobil, pfizer, and wal-mart, dozens of right-wing think tanks and foundations, two dozen corporate law firms and lobbying firms, and some thousand state legislators, a few of them democrats, the majority of them republican. >> alec is a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interes
was in michigan today, campaigning on his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. speaking to union workers at the daimler detroit diesel engine plant, the president said he is willing to compromise "a little bit" with republicans on getting a plan for economic growth, job creation, and reducing the deficit. but he said he would not compromise on raising tax rates for high-income earners. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks, and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans, or suddenly, a school doesn't have school books because the school district couldn't afford it. >> susie: meanwhile, a ranking democrat on the house budget committee tells "nightly business report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face
far beyond the ports. >> reporter: if a deal isn't reached by 12:01 a.m. sunday, union dock-workers will take to the picket-line. 15 ports span the east and gulf coasts. and while they're in different locations, handling different types of cargo, they all agree, a strike would be very bad for business. >> it's really important for the people in our country to recognize, in this state, that a strike combined with the ongoing negotiations between congress and president obama regarding, um, the so-called fiscal cliff could be a one, two combination knock out for nation's economy. >> if a strike does happen that means a big chunk of the more than 14,000 members of the international longshoresmen association will be off the job. >> reporter: the ports impacted generate an estimated $11 billion in state and local taxes annually. but losses from any strike will be felt far beyond the coast, with industries as diverse as agriculture, manufacturing and retail taking a hit. that's got the national retail federation urging president obama to intervene: >> the ports are a critical compo
of cooperation between the district and the teachers' union in planning for the common core implementation. >> as contentious as our relationship has been, the one place that we totally agree is on how to figure out instructional delivery. >> reporter: but the good feeling between the union and the district breaks down when it comes to how students will be evaluated. beginning in 2014-15 school year a new assessment test will replace the current state test. the results could be shocking. >> the reality is we're actually going to see a drop-off. we're close to around 70% of students at proficient on the illinois test right now. predictions show that we may drop to somewhere in the teens. in terms of proficiency. that's chicago. but that's going to be a trend we're going to see across the country. the standards are that much more rigorous. >> reporter: the union is concerned that a dramatic drop in test scores could have a disastrous impact for teachers who will be evaluated on student performance. >> everyone will be judged and possibly very harshly. what we're really concerned about is tha
unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownwnersp rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and radio stations within a given community. and that means people are jujus not going to be hearing diffe
21 points to close at 2,992. the european union came a step closer to a full-fledged banking union today. after an all-night meeting in brussels, e.u. finance ministers agreed to give the european central bank oversight of eurozone banks, as well as banks in other e.u. countries that choose to opt-in. the european commissioner for economic and monetary affairs said the agreement was an important step forward for europe. >> last night's decision on the single supervisory mechanism for euro area banks is a breakthrough towards a true banking union, which is significant and crucial in order to restore and reinforce confidence in the european economy. >> sreenivasan: the banking superviser role must be approved by the european parliament, but the position could be up and running by march of next year. separately, finance ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s
or not it's permissible, you know, the way that you get out of the union once you're in is not something i think wisely that the founding fathers decided to, you know, address. and it left the question open, and lincoln's interpretation which i agree with is, you know, you can't opt out of civilization; you can't opt out of the social contract. and secession is another name for the beginnings of a kind of social disintegration. i mean, by the end of the civil war alabama was threatening to secede from the confederacy. just a couple of weeks ago when the texans said, "we're going to secede from the united states," austin said, "well, good, then we're seceding from texas." and that's the way it tends to go, it will disintegrate. and the idea of preserving a union, the mystical idea of a union, i think he got how essential that was for the whole thing to work. so the cost was horrendous, i mean, we now think maybe as many as 800,000, not the 600,000. and this is, i think a very gentle man who suffered terribly at the thought of this kind of dying and death and, you know, was devoted to his so
of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks
. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death count climbed to 16. the system dumped a foot or more of snow in parts of pennsylvania, upstate new york and new hampshire. in some places, snow brought road travel to a standstill. at the same time, operations at major airports improved, with far fewer delays than earlier this week. in india, the embattled prime minister remained under pressure to take action against sexual assaults after a gang rape this month triggered violent protests. manmohan singh promised a thorough review of india's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits
crippled after clerical workers went on strike and were supported by the longshoreman's union, which refused to cross the picket line. the shutdown cost $1 billion a day. the work stoppage also forced ships to reroute to ports in mexico, panama and northern california. a tentative deal was reached late last night after federal mediators joined negotiations. no details yet on the deal, but workers are expected to get new terms that will prevent jobs from being outsourced. >> tom: we saw the influence of apple on any stock index which includes it. without apple, the dow rallied. but the nasdaq and s&p 500 were weighed down thanks to apple's weakness. the s&p 500 hit its lowest level of the session just after a stronger than expected report on the services sector before 11:00 a.m. eastern time. it bounced into positive territory and closed up 0.2%. volume picked up a little on the big board with 757 million shares. 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector was the big drag on the broad market. it fell 1.3%. the utility sector saw the best gains, up 1.6%. apple put the brake
paychecks than low earning workers. >> in the state of >> reporter: in his state of the union address almost a year ago, the president announced a change to the way some people pay back their student loans. it seemed like a small change. instead of paying 15 percent of their income over 25 years, people who enroll in income- based repayment will now only pay 10% of their income over 20 years. but critics say the new program has a big problem, an accounting flaw that could lead to a big windfall for high-earning graduate degree holders. >> you've got a moral hazard. you've got an incentive to borrow away knowing that you're not going to have to pay it back. >> reporter: here's how it can be a problem-- graduate students can borrow an unlimited amount of money to pay for school. they start their careers with small or moderate salaries, making monthly payments of 10% of their income. but remember, grad students often become very high earners, like doctors and lawyers. as their salaries increase, the monthly payments on the student loans are capped based on the borrower's debt at graduation. tha
saw more selling in some cigarette stocks. as we previewed last night, the european union today proposed bigger health warnings on cigarette packages and a complete ban on strong flavors like menthol. philip morris ares droppriro 2.1%. it is the world's biggest cigarette maker measured by revenue. in the dow, some analysts concerns hit shares of general electric and alcoa.. g.e. fell hard, down 3.1%. investment bank u.b.s. remoed the strek from its favored list thinking earnings growth will slow. i alcoa dropped 3%. moody's put the company's credit rating on review for possible downgrade, thanks to falling aluminum prices. fighting against the weak market was oracle. the database software reported a strong quarter last night. and shares responded, jumping 3.7%, taking the stock to its highest price since the spring of 2011. digital storage stocks rebounded. western digital was up four percent. seagate technology increased 3.3%. both received positive analyst comments. fed-ex delivered earnings that were down from a year ag but still stronger than anticipated. the drop from a yea
, they actually own the air space over union station here in washington d.c. that they'll put to use somehow, some way. so investors who buy behind lukadia, luk, you have to put some faith into the investors, these guys who run it will put the cast to work in smart ways and history is on its side here. >> tom: you're buying the investment team as much as those individual companies. do you own any yourself in these two companies, andy? >> i do not own core labs or lukadia. >> tom: andy cross with the motley fool. >> susie: wall street wisdom says if santa claus comes to broadway and wall in the last five trading days of the year, stocks rise in the new year. but no signs of santa today, with mostly red and little green on this day before christmas. big board volume fell to 285 million shares. nasdaq volume weighed in at 616 million. it was the lightest volume so far this year. two s&p sector standouts were materials, which gained half a percent, and energy, which lost nearly 1%. some news from the oil patch. chevron is buying a stake in two canadian shale gas fields as well as a facility to ship th
lincoln quote. in fact, barack obama quoted from the same passage in his state of the union address. >> i'm a democrat. but i believe what republican abraham lincoln believed-- that government should do for people only what they cannot do better by themselves and no more. ( applause ) >> you can take away from lincoln almost anything that you want. presidents in war time, embattled presidents, unpopular presidents-- they all look to lincoln. he's their patron saint, because no president was more embattled or more unpopular than lincoln was during his presidency. we think he was born on mount rushmore. not so. theodore roosevelt hung his picture in the president's office and said, "whenever i have a major decision to make, i always ask myself would lincoln would do." woodrow wilson, who was a son of the south, who remembered seeing jefferson davis in chains being led past him at the end of the war nevertheless developed something of a hero worship for lincoln. richard nixon, as a 12-year-old, was given a portrait of lincoln that he hung over his bed. nixon also justified what would later b
their constitutions to bar gay unions. here with us to explain today's development, and where it could lead, is marcia coyle of "the national law journal." welcome back, marcia. >> thanks, marg wet. >> warner: so is it fair to say first of all that the court's decision to hear these first two cases in itself a momentous decision? >> absolutely. a number of gay rights organizations, particularly as if relates to the federal defense of marriage act have been working towards that point. and yes, whatever the court says, if it reaches the merits of these cases will be extremely important. >> warner: let's take them one by one, prop 8 in california first. remind us briefly of how what started out as a state issue ended am in the supreme court. >> the california supreme court a number of year its ago ruled that same sex marriages were constitutional under its state constitution. voters disagreed by passing proposition 8 in 2008 banning those marriages. proposition 8 was challenged by gay and lesbian couples who were represented by former opponents ted olson and david buoyes. it ultimately reached the federa
, a senior scientist and co-director of global security at the union of concerned scientists. and han park, professor of international affairs at the university of georgia. he travels frequently to north korea and witnessed april's failed rocket launch there. welcome, gentlemen. david wright, beginning with you, how big an advance in this in north korea's drive to develop its long-range missile capability and then to ten potentially something that could be married with their nuclear program? >> . >> we've known for a long time, a number of years north koreans had the individual components that it could use, rocket engines, things like that. it's put them together in a rocket that looks like it has the capability to do what they did yesterday. what they haven't been able to do is to get it to all work together and all work at the same time. so from my point of view, i don't feel that much differently about their program today than i did two days ago simply because the fact that they were able to get everything to work yesterday doesn't mean they could do it again. it doesn't tell me anythin
represented the state of hawaii in congress from the moment it was admitted to the union in 1959. >> our friend dan inouye just died. >> brown: his passing was announced last night to a stunned senate chamber by majority leader harry reid. >> the service in the senate will be... >> an iconic political figure of his beloved hawaii and the only original member of a congressional delegation still serving in congress. >> brown: this afternoon inowe way's deputy chief of staff recalled the senator. >> with all due respect to the president of the united states, inowe way is hawaii's greatest statesman. he always saw things three steps ahead. >> brown: he was born in honolulu in 1924 to immigrant parents. on december 7, 1941, he rushed to help the wounded at pearl harbor. long years later he recalled the u.s. government's war-time decision to declare his family and other japannese americans enemy aliens. >> i put on the uniform to show where my heart stood. but we were denied. so we petitioned the government and a year later they said, okay, if you wish to volunteer go ahead. >> announcer: 442n
consumerism, you know? as an immigrant from the former soviet union, anastasia gonye has lived the alternative. >> i stood in line for bread, so there was not enough of things that are necessary to survive, you know, i had to make things for myself-- that's how i started, how i learned that skill, because i had to make clothes myself, if i wanted to look halfway decent. so, it's different. >> reporter: but this is better? >> of course it's better. way better. >> reporter: now, the soviet planned economy grew out of the communist revolution of 1917. but in the us back then, the market reigned, channeling wealth to its most productive uses. the new infomercial thinks that that should still the model. >> increasing productivity needs more savings and investment, the true engine of economic growth. now, hear friedrich hayek sing a song of savings. >> ♪ your savings are borrowed by businessmen, productions ♪ structure is changed. they invest in workers and ♪ capital goods. our economy re-arranged. ♪ >> reporter: but in a recent book, against thrift, livingston shows that private investment,
to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i don't worry about the outrage fading. i worry about our collective courage to break through. and again, for me and for so many people in this country, this is not a new issue. we've been fighting this issue for a long, long time. i, in chicago we buried a child killed by gun violence every two weeks. think about that, every two weeks we bury a child. the vast majority innocent children. one at their birthday parties, in the afternoon. these aren't-- the vast ma jorbted aren't gangbangers. >> ifill: but outside of that neighborhood, it goes unremarked upon, mostly. >> that is what i worry about, is the lack of courage, the lack of willingness to break through. we have an endemic here, and we need to change that in a very fundamental way. and as i said for the horror and the anguish and the pain, i do think the world has shifted. i think people have a sense that enough is enough. and when you have, you know, 20 babies and six t
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)